Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

The winter break workshop series from OSU Libraries lets you catch up on some skills that you’ve been putting off learning like Qualtrics, Git, EndNote, and Zotero

Registration is encouraged but not required. View all the offerings in the library’s winter break workshop series and register for your sessions (we’ll send you a reminder) at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops.

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

The winter break workshop series from OSU Libraries lets you catch up on some skills that you’ve been putting off learning like Qualtrics, Git, EndNote, and Zotero

Registration is encouraged but not required. View all the offerings in the library’s winter break workshop series and register for your sessions (we’ll send you a reminder) at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops.

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

 

The Institute for Natural Resources and Oregon State University Libraries and Press, in partnership with a number of Oregon state agencies and universities, recently launched several new topical webpages and tools as part of the Oregon Explorer Natural Resources Digital Library.

The new Oregon Hazards Reporter allows users to view flood, tsunami, earthquake, volcano and landslide hazard data from multiple state and federal agencies. Users can delineate an area for any location in Oregon and generate a preliminary hazard report. The preliminary hazard reports include a hazard description, data description and limitations of use. This tool was developed for use by local planners in partnership with the Oregon Department of Land Conservation. 

Throughout Oregon, there are a growing number of local collaborative groups engaged with forest restoration to help minimize wildfire risk, support local economies and improve forest management. The University of Oregon Ecosystem Workforce Program has been actively developing and updating this statewide forest restoration dataset. The Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Solutions reached out to the Oregon Explorer program to make this data publicly accessible through a map viewer and a new Forest Collaborative landing page. 

Eastern Oregon is home to over 15 million acres of sage-grouse habitat. Once abundant, the range and numbers of sage-grouse have declined. The Sage-Grouse Conservation Partnership advances policies and actions that reduce threats to sage-grouse, sagebrush ecosystems and Oregon's rural communities. The Oregon Explorer was selected as the place to make information about sage-grouse and the SageCon partnership available. The new Oregon Explorer Sage-Grouse landing page, Sage-Grouse Data Viewer, Sage-Grouse Development Registry and several articles were developed to inform planning activities in Oregon’s sage-grouse habitats. Funding and support was provided by the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Oregon Department of Administrative Services and the Portland State University National Policy Consensus Center.

 

The Institute for Natural Resources and Oregon State University Libraries and Press, in partnership with a number of Oregon state agencies and universities, recently launched several new topical webpages and tools as part of the Oregon Explorer Natural Resources Digital Library.

The new Oregon Hazards Reporter allows users to view flood, tsunami, earthquake, volcano and landslide hazard data from multiple state and federal agencies. Users can delineate an area for any location in Oregon and generate a preliminary hazard report. The preliminary hazard reports include a hazard description, data description and limitations of use. This tool was developed for use by local planners in partnership with the Oregon Department of Land Conservation. 

Throughout Oregon, there are a growing number of local collaborative groups engaged with forest restoration to help minimize wildfire risk, support local economies and improve forest management. The University of Oregon Ecosystem Workforce Program has been actively developing and updating this statewide forest restoration dataset. The Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon Solutions reached out to the Oregon Explorer program to make this data publicly accessible through a map viewer and a new Forest Collaborative landing page. 

Eastern Oregon is home to over 15 million acres of sage-grouse habitat. Once abundant, the range and numbers of sage-grouse have declined. The Sage-Grouse Conservation Partnership advances policies and actions that reduce threats to sage-grouse, sagebrush ecosystems and Oregon's rural communities. The Oregon Explorer was selected as the place to make information about sage-grouse and the SageCon partnership available. The new Oregon Explorer Sage-Grouse landing page, Sage-Grouse Data Viewer, Sage-Grouse Development Registry and several articles were developed to inform planning activities in Oregon’s sage-grouse habitats. Funding and support was provided by the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Oregon Department of Administrative Services and the Portland State University National Policy Consensus Center.

The Library Faculty Association Seminar Series and Research Presentations brings presenters from the OSU Library and from other organizations to talk about their research projects. All members of the campus community are invited to attend.

On December 8, we will have three speakers from the Corvallis-Benton Public Library. Bonnie Brzozowski, Reference Librarian at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, will talk about the programs and events offered at their library; a sample of successful programs and events will be highlighted along with details about how they were developed, including information about the partnerships that make most of them possible. Kristy Kemper Hodge, Youth Librarian at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, will propose fun and engaging exercises to work on empathy and design thinking. Ashlee Chavez, the Library Director of the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, will talk about the work that the library staff is doing to evaluate their community’s needs; ideas for potential new spaces and services will be shared, and feedback would be very welcomed.

December 8, 10:00-11:30 a.m.

Willamette Seminar Rooms, third floor of the Valley Library

From news release, Nov. 2, 2017

 

Oregon Tilth has helped lead the way since 1974 on moving organic agriculture into a science and research-based approach to sustainable food production. Based in Corvallis, their archived records are now available at Oregon State University’s Valley Library.

These records can be useful to organic farmers, organic gardeners, people in the organic food industry, researchers interested in organic agriculture and nonprofit management, agricultural policymakers, land reform advocates and conservation organizations.

The collection contains diverse archive materials, including early manuals linked to organic certification, educational publications and curriculum, board meeting minutes, photos, and issues of “In Good Tilth,” a key communication tool for Oregon Tilth throughout its history.

"A collection at OSU helps establish and preserve Oregon Tilth’s legacy as a pioneering organization that envisions a more sustainable and equitable food system,” states Chris Schreiner, executive director of Oregon Tilth. “Researchers and others interested in the sustainable and organic food movement can chart Oregon Tilth’s important contributions, accomplishments and metamorphosis over time."

The Oregon Tilth Records include 29 boxes of materials that can be accessed by anyone visiting OSU’s Valley Library, and the collection is housed on the library’s fifth floor in the Special Collections and Archives Research Center. The collection will be updated over time.

 “Oregon Tilth has had a significant influence on the shaping of organic agriculture in this country and around the world over the past four decades,” according to Larry Landis, director of the Special Collections and Archives Research Center at OSU Libraries. “We’re hoping that this collection serves as the cornerstone for the acquisition of other collections pertaining to sustainable agriculture in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest.”

OSU’s Valley Library received the collection from Oregon Tilth in May 2017, the processing phase is nearly completed, and the Oregon Tilth Records at OSU officially opened with an event on November 4 at the library.

Oregon Tilth’s mission is to make our food production systems biologically sound and socially equitable. They work to balance the needs of people and planet through focus on core areas of certification, conservation, social equity and the marketplace. More info is at tilth.org.

“The Messenger” magazine, which OSU Libraries and Press publishes twice a year, has a new issue available. The magazine highlights the accomplishments and ongoing efforts of the Libraries and Press, and here are some of the stories that you’ll find inside:

— “Think It Would Be Cool to Have Access to Books Printed Before 1700? Donor Funding Provides Access to Early English Books Online”

— “Some Families have Long Ties to the University (like, five generations long)”

— “Book Series from OSU Press Captivates Kids and Inspires Interest in the Natural World”

— “Ever Wonder How Many People Use the Valley Library in a Week?”

— “Interview with a Mover and Shaker”

“The Messenger” is available at multiple locations inside the Valley Library, including in the information rack inside the main entrance, and online at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/the-messenger-recent-issue. See what's new and newsworthy at your library.

“The Messenger” magazine, which OSU Libraries and Press publishes twice a year, has a new issue available. The magazine highlights the accomplishments and ongoing efforts of the Libraries and Press, and here are some of the stories that you’ll find inside:

— “Think It Would Be Cool to Have Access to Books Printed Before 1700? Donor Funding Provides Access to Early English Books Online”

— “Some Families have Long Ties to the University (like, five generations long)”

— “Book Series from OSU Press Captivates Kids and Inspires Interest in the Natural World”

— “Ever Wonder How Many People Use the Valley Library in a Week?”

— “Interview with a Mover and Shaker”

“The Messenger” is available at multiple locations inside the Valley Library, including in the information rack inside the main entrance, and online at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/the-messenger-recent-issue. See what's new and newsworthy at your library.

“The Messenger” magazine, which OSU Libraries and Press publishes twice a year, has a new issue available. The magazine highlights the accomplishments and ongoing efforts of the Libraries and Press, and here are some of the stories that you’ll find inside:

— “Think It Would Be Cool to Have Access to Books Printed Before 1700? Donor Funding Provides Access to Early English Books Online”

— “Some Families have Long Ties to the University (like, five generations long)”

— “Book Series from OSU Press Captivates Kids and Inspires Interest in the Natural World”

— “Ever Wonder How Many People Use the Valley Library in a Week?”

— “Interview with a Mover and Shaker”

“The Messenger” is available at multiple locations inside the Valley Library, including in the information rack inside the main entrance, and online at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/the-messenger-recent-issue. See what's new and newsworthy at your library.

Four new oral history websites comprising more than 550 hours of content have been released by the Oral History Program at the Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC). Three of these websites were built using open source resources that are available to other repositories seeking to provide online access to their own oral history collections.

OSU 150

The largest of these sites, The OSU Sesquicentennial Oral History Project, celebrates 150 years of OSU history by presenting 276 interviews conducted with OSU alumni, faculty, staff, current students and supporters. The project’s web portal is comprised of more than 400 hours of media and more than 3.4 million words of transcription. About 1.8 TB of born-digital content were collected in building what is the largest oral history project ever conducted at Oregon State.

The vast majority of the interviews presented on the site were video recorded and all are contextualized with full-text transcripts, interview abstracts and biographical sketches. Users also have the option of sorting interviews by interviewee affiliation or interview theme, and are free to download .mp3 audio files of all interviews as well.

OHMS/Omeka Sites

In addition, three websites using a combination of the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS) and the Omeka web publishing platform are also now available. These websites are:

All three of these websites utilize a combination of OHMS, the Omeka Seasons theme, the OHMSObject plug-in, and custom .css and .php modifications that have been released by the OSU Libraries on GitHub. Additional details on how the sites were created are provided in Technical Notes appended to each project. 

For more information on any of these initiatives, please contact Chris Petersen, Senior Faculty Research Assistant in SCARC.

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