Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

 OSU Libraries and Press do a wide array of amazing stuff, and an Impact Report is compiled each year that offers highlights of the work that gets done and summarizes the amazing accomplishments of the previous year.

 In addition to scintillating facts and figures and an overview of some of the many accomplishments of Libraries and Press faculty and staff, there’s also some cool quotes about libraries and books. Here’s one:

 “Libraries are reservoirs of strength, grace and wit, reminders of order, calm and continuity, lakes of mental energy....In any library in the world, I am at home, unselfconscious, still and absorbed.” — Germaine Greer

 Like that one? Here’s one more:

 “I have an unshaken conviction that democracy can never be undermined if we maintain our library resources and a national intelligence capable of utilizing them.” — Franklin D. Roosevelt

 You can read the new Impact Report for the Libraries and Press here.

 

Check out the new exhibit “Community, Collaboration, Craft: A Glimpse of Art at OSU” at the Special Collections and Archives Research Center gallery on the fifth floor of the Valley Library.

Discover what puppet noses, danceramics, and wood marquetry have in common in this celebration of artistic inspiration on campus. The reception for the exhibit is on February 15 from 4:00-6:00 p.m., and the exhibit is on display until May 31. The blog for the exhibit is at http://wpmu.library.oregonstate.edu/osu_archives/2018/01/17/a-new-exhibit-at-scarc/.

 

The Oregon State University Libraries are once again soliciting applications for its Resident Scholar program. Now celebrating its 11th year, the program provides research grants of up to $2,500 to support work done in the OSU Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center.  

SCARC collects in five primary areas: the history of science; the history of OSU; natural resources in the Pacific Northwest (including hops and brewing, but also forestry, marine resources, and Northwest agriculture); multicultural communities of Oregon; and rare books. Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students, and independent scholars are all invited to apply.

Much more about the program, including its application form, is available at http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/residentscholar.html.  

Applications must be received by April 30, 2018. 

For more information, please contact scarc@oregonstate.edu.

The Oregon State University Libraries are once again soliciting applications for its Resident Scholar program. Now celebrating its 11th year, the program provides research grants of up to $2,500 to support work done in the OSU Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center.  

SCARC collects in five primary areas: the history of science; the history of OSU; natural resources in the Pacific Northwest (including hops and brewing, but also forestry, marine resources, and Northwest agriculture); multicultural communities of Oregon; and rare books. Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students, and independent scholars are all invited to apply.

Much more about the program, including its application form, is available at http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/residentscholar.html.  

Applications must be received by April 30, 2018. 

For more information, please contact scarc@oregonstate.edu.

The Oregon State University Libraries are once again soliciting applications for its Resident Scholar program. Now celebrating its 11th year, the program provides research grants of up to $2,500 to support work done in the OSU Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center.  

SCARC collects in five primary areas: the history of science; the history of OSU; natural resources in the Pacific Northwest (including hops and brewing, but also forestry, marine resources, and Northwest agriculture); multicultural communities of Oregon; and rare books. Historians, librarians, graduate, doctoral or post-doctoral students, and independent scholars are all invited to apply.

Much more about the program, including its application form, is available at http://scarc.library.oregonstate.edu/residentscholar.html.  

Applications must be received by April 30, 2018. 

For more information, please contact scarc@oregonstate.edu.

On Sunday, Dec. 3, a small electrical fire at the Valley Library set off the fire alarms and necessitated the evacuation of the building. As one of the busiest public buildings on campus, the safety of our community is our top priority. Many people in the building evacuated in a timely fashion. However, many others ignored the fire alarms and did not clear the building. While we all hope that emergencies will not happen, they do, so we'd like to take this opportunity to make our emergency procedures clear, so that you will know what you need to do to keep everyone who uses the library safe.

  • When you hear an emergency alarm in a library building, you must leave immediately. In fact, failure to do so could result in a misdemeanor fine from the Corvallis Fire Department.
  • In a building the size of the Valley Library, we cannot verify that an alarm is not a false alarm before we act, and neither should you. Do not assume that an alarm is a drill. Instead, leave the building quickly and quietly. 
  • OSU Library employees will be available to help direct you as you leave the building. Be aware that they are not trained emergency responders. If you notice another person in distress, exit the building and notify a library staff member. They will notify emergency personnel.
  • Please treat the library staff and students who are trying to clear the building with respect, and remember that they have a job to do.

Four new oral history websites comprising more than 550 hours of content have been released by the Oral History Program at the Oregon State University Libraries Special Collections and Archives Research Center (SCARC). Three of these websites were built using open source resources that are available to other repositories seeking to provide online access to their own oral history collections.

OSU 150

The largest of these sites, The OSU Sesquicentennial Oral History Project, celebrates 150 years of OSU history by presenting 276 interviews conducted with OSU alumni, faculty, staff, current students and supporters. The project’s web portal is comprised of more than 400 hours of media and more than 3.4 million words of transcription. About 1.8 TB of born-digital content were collected in building what is the largest oral history project ever conducted at Oregon State.

The vast majority of the interviews presented on the site were video recorded and all are contextualized with full-text transcripts, interview abstracts and biographical sketches. Users also have the option of sorting interviews by interviewee affiliation or interview theme, and are free to download .mp3 audio files of all interviews as well.

OHMS/Omeka Sites

In addition, three websites using a combination of the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS) and the Omeka web publishing platform are also now available. These websites are:

All three of these websites utilize a combination of OHMS, the Omeka Seasons theme, the OHMSObject plug-in, and custom .css and .php modifications that have been released by the OSU Libraries on GitHub. Additional details on how the sites were created are provided in Technical Notes appended to each project. 

For more information on any of these initiatives, please contact Chris Petersen, Senior Faculty Research Assistant in SCARC.

With the arrival of fall, the days are getting shorter and the nights longer. If you are on campus after dark, be aware of these biking tips and safety resources for getting around campus at night.

Be Bright. Be Smart.

Whether you drive a car or ride a bike, you can do plenty of things to get around more safely.

Be bright – When on a bike at night, be seen by turning on your front and rear bike lights, using reflective gear on your bike, backpack or clothing, and by wearing brighter colors. A headlight illuminates your way ahead and makes you visible; in addition, Oregon law requires a bright white light on the front of your bike after dark. If you’re without a light, a temporary solution is a flashlight app on your smartphone (just don't drop your phone).

If you’re on foot in the dark, there are ways to be more visible to drivers such as by wearing a bright jacket or other clothing, choosing a bright-colored umbrella for rainy nights, and by placing a flashing light or reflective strips on your backpack, purse or messenger bag.

Stay sharp – When on the road, be alert. Drive and ride without distractions, watch for potential dangers ahead, and pay careful attention to obstacles on the road.

Provide a cushion – Keep a safe distance from the vehicles ahead in case they suddenly stop without warning.

For more info about biking safely at night, go to http://poweredbyorange.com/special-issues/be-bright/.

Be Bright is a collaborative effort between Oregon State University and the City of Corvallis to encourage Corvallis citizens and the OSU community to increase their visibility on their daily commute.

 

Here are some great safety-related resources on campus:

AOSU Saferide Shuttle Service — http://asosu.oregonstate.edu/services/saferide or 541-737-5000. SafeRide is a service dedicated to providing OSU students with a safer ride home or to campus, free from judgment. Saferide operates throughout the Corvallis and Philomath communities, and it is open to all OSU students on the Corvallis campus. Download the app SafeRide OSU from Google Play for Android or iTunes Store for the iPhone. For those without a smartphone, call the dispatchers at 541-737-5000.

The Department of Public Safety on campus will provide a personal escort when you need one – just call 541-737-3010.

Blue light emergency phones are located throughout campus, and yellow box security phones at located at resident hall entrances.

Public Safety provides a campus map showing lighted walking routes, as well as personal safety tips, at the Campus by Night webpage at http://fa.oregonstate.edu/publicsafety.

Join us in our new studio space in the Valley Library. What is the Undergrad Research and Writing Studio? It's a supportive place to work on your research and writing projects at any stage of your research and writing process and receive help from trained peer consultants. Everyone, at some point, can use some tips on research and writing, and here’s a comfortable space for getting answers to your questions and tips for improving your work. 

No appointments are necessary: just drop in and start working. Bring your laptop, pencils, audio recorder, paper, notecards — whatever tools work for you. 

The new Undergrad Research and Writing Studio is located on the second (main) floor of the Valley Library behind the Info Desk and printers. Info is available at studio.library.oregonstate.edu.

Current studio hours:

Monday–Thursday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Friday 10 a.m.–5 p.m.


Sunday 2 p.m.–7 p.m.

Welcome to the new 1Search User Interface.

We're rolling out a new 1Search user interface on August 28. Here's some key points:

  • All your data is still there. Active loans, Summit borrowing requests, and user data won't be affected. (Looking for your e-Shelf? It's now called My Favorites, and you can access it in the main menu by clicking the Pin icon next to your username.)
  • 1Search will act the same. Course reserves, getting things from other libraries, accessing articles - you can still perform these actions (and more) in the new 1Search. 
  • A new responsive design. The new user interface is designed to work on mobile devices. Search on your mobile phone, tablet, or other small screen device and you will have an uncompromised search environment for your research needs. 

Here's some important information:

1. If you are linking to articles, ebooks, or records in 1Search using the built-in permalink feature, you will be automatically redirected to the new UI. No need to change anything.

2. If you have a saved query and email alert or relied on copy/pasting the page's URL, you may end up in the Classic UI. Don't worry - the Classic UI will stay up and will still work. In order to get back to the New UI, be sure to recreate the link or email alert in the New UI. 

What's new for 1Search:

  • A mobile-friendly responsive design, built using AngularJS.
  • A new and improved article recommender system that will connect users to related resources. 
  • Fewer clicks needed to conduct searches and requests means fewer barriers between resources and users. 
  • A new Browse feature allows users to browse by genre or Library of Congress Call Number. 

Feedback

We're always looking for feedback on how we can improve our services. Please use the following survey to let us know what you think about the new 1Search.


Frequently Asked Questions: 

When is the new UI going live? 

  • We launched the new UI of 1Search on August 28th, 2017. 

Why did this change? I liked the old version! 

  • The Classic UI had some major issues with displaying on mobile and small screen devices. The new framework allows users on those devices to search, access resources, and conduct research without compromising any features. The New UI also comes with some new key features that we are excited to bring to the OSU community. The Classic UI will remain live, but links on the library website will defer to the New UI. 

Where did my e-shelf go?

Image of the My Favorites pin



The e-Shelf has been renamed to "My Favorites." All your items are still there. To access it, log in to your account and click on the My Favorites Pin icon to the left of your username.


Who should I contact with questions about the new version of 1Search?

You can chat or call library staff or you can email Dan Moore at dan.moore@oregonstate.edu

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