Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

Think it would be cool to be able to access books printed before 1700?

Now you can.

Students and faculty can now browse, read, mark up, download and mine thousands of texts originally printed from 1473 to 1700 in the United Kingdom and elsewhere using the Early English Books Online (EEBO) database that's now available through OSU Libraries. 

Access to the Early English Books Online collection is as easy as typing “EEBO” in the search box on the Libraries homepage at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu and logging in with your OSU password. 

From the first book published in English through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare, this incomparable collection contains more than 130,000 titles and more than 17 million scanned pages. Scholars have long treasured this collection, and now it’s accessible online. 

“I am thrilled that we are finally able to offer EEBO to the faculty and students of Oregon State University,” says Laurel Kristick, Collection Assessment and Science Librarian at OSU Libraries. “We‘ve been working on this for almost a decade and finally had the donor funds we needed to purchase it.” 

The EEBO database now contains page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473–1700. In addition to English, EEBO covers more than 30 languages from Algonquin to Welsh. More than 200 libraries worldwide have contributed to the EEBO collection. 

The content covers science, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, geography and all other areas of human endeavor, including topics from sword fighting to witchcraft and gardening manuals. The collections have been most widely used by scholars of English, linguistics and history, although these resources also include core texts in art, women’s studies, the history of science, education, religious studies, math, law and music. 

The following are but a small sampling of the authors whose works are included: Erasmus, Shakespeare, King James I, Marlowe, Galileo, Caxton, Chaucer, Malory, Boyle, Newton, Locke, More, Milton, Spenser, Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Purcell, Behn and Defoe.

Besides browsing and reading through these early English books, users can search through the entire corpus. Searching for keywords and themes is possible because the text has been encoded with Extensible Markup Language (XML). To accompany the page images, accurate transcriptions have been created of many thousands of the works in order to aid researchers of all levels.

Think it would be cool to be able to access books printed before 1700?

Now you can.

Students and faculty can now browse, read, mark up, download and mine thousands of texts originally printed from 1473 to 1700 in the United Kingdom and elsewhere using the Early English Books Online (EEBO) database that's now available through OSU Libraries. 

Access to the Early English Books Online collection is as easy as typing “EEBO” in the search box on the Libraries homepage at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu and logging in with your OSU password. 

From the first book published in English through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare, this incomparable collection contains more than 130,000 titles and more than 17 million scanned pages. Scholars have long treasured this collection, and now it’s accessible online. 

“I am thrilled that we are finally able to offer EEBO to the faculty and students of Oregon State University,” says Laurel Kristick, Collection Assessment and Science Librarian at OSU Libraries. “We‘ve been working on this for almost a decade and finally had the donor funds we needed to purchase it.” 

The EEBO database now contains page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473–1700. In addition to English, EEBO covers more than 30 languages from Algonquin to Welsh. More than 200 libraries worldwide have contributed to the EEBO collection. 

The content covers science, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, geography and all other areas of human endeavor, including topics from sword fighting to witchcraft and gardening manuals. The collections have been most widely used by scholars of English, linguistics and history, although these resources also include core texts in art, women’s studies, the history of science, education, religious studies, math, law and music. 

The following are but a small sampling of the authors whose works are included: Erasmus, Shakespeare, King James I, Marlowe, Galileo, Caxton, Chaucer, Malory, Boyle, Newton, Locke, More, Milton, Spenser, Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Purcell, Behn and Defoe.

Besides browsing and reading through these early English books, users can search through the entire corpus. Searching for keywords and themes is possible because the text has been encoded with Extensible Markup Language (XML). To accompany the page images, accurate transcriptions have been created of many thousands of the works in order to aid researchers of all levels.

Think it would be cool to be able to access books printed before 1700?

Now you can.

Students and faculty can now browse, read, mark up, download and mine thousands of texts originally printed from 1473 to 1700 in the United Kingdom and elsewhere using the Early English Books Online (EEBO) database that's now available through OSU Libraries. 

Access to the Early English Books Online collection is as easy as typing “EEBO” in the search box on the Libraries homepage at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu and logging in with your OSU password. 

From the first book published in English through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare, this incomparable collection contains more than 130,000 titles and more than 17 million scanned pages. Scholars have long treasured this collection, and now it’s accessible online. 

“I am thrilled that we are finally able to offer EEBO to the faculty and students of Oregon State University,” says Laurel Kristick, Collection Assessment and Science Librarian at OSU Libraries. “We‘ve been working on this for almost a decade and finally had the donor funds we needed to purchase it.” 

The EEBO database now contains page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473–1700. In addition to English, EEBO covers more than 30 languages from Algonquin to Welsh. More than 200 libraries worldwide have contributed to the EEBO collection. 

The content covers science, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, geography and all other areas of human endeavor, including topics from sword fighting to witchcraft and gardening manuals. The collections have been most widely used by scholars of English, linguistics and history, although these resources also include core texts in art, women’s studies, the history of science, education, religious studies, math, law and music. 

The following are but a small sampling of the authors whose works are included: Erasmus, Shakespeare, King James I, Marlowe, Galileo, Caxton, Chaucer, Malory, Boyle, Newton, Locke, More, Milton, Spenser, Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Purcell, Behn and Defoe.

Besides browsing and reading through these early English books, users can search through the entire corpus. Searching for keywords and themes is possible because the text has been encoded with Extensible Markup Language (XML). To accompany the page images, accurate transcriptions have been created of many thousands of the works in order to aid researchers of all levels.

Index Islamicus Online is the international classified bibliography of publications in European languages on all aspects of Islam and the Muslim world. It contains more than 500,000 records that cover all the main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, as well as Muslims living elsewhere, and their history, beliefs, societies, cultures, languages and literatures. This unique and valuable bibliography is now available to Oregon State students, faculty and staff.

Index Islamicus includes material published by Western scholars in the fields of Humanities and Social Sciences, specialist area- and subject-based areas, and by Muslims writing in European languages. Publications recorded are in the form of articles, books and reviews. 

Periodicals

More than 5,000 journals are surveyed for inclusion in the database, together with conference proceedings, monographs, multi-authored works and book reviews. Journals and books are indexed down to the article and chapter level. Newspapers, news magazines, and government or official publications are excluded.

Classification

The Index Islamicus classification scheme, which is uniquely and carefully geared to the field of Islamic Studies, allows one to quickly find all literature headed under a particular, broader subject area (such as Education, Philosophy, Shi’ism, Sudan, Palestine, Israel, as well as their subcategories). Learn more at Index Islamicus Online.

Index Islamicus Online is the international classified bibliography of publications in European languages on all aspects of Islam and the Muslim world. It contains more than 500,000 records that cover all the main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, as well as Muslims living elsewhere, and their history, beliefs, societies, cultures, languages and literatures. This unique and valuable bibliography is now available to Oregon State students, faculty and staff.

Index Islamicus includes material published by Western scholars in the fields of Humanities and Social Sciences, specialist area- and subject-based areas, and by Muslims writing in European languages. Publications recorded are in the form of articles, books and reviews. 

Periodicals

More than 5,000 journals are surveyed for inclusion in the database, together with conference proceedings, monographs, multi-authored works and book reviews. Journals and books are indexed down to the article and chapter level. Newspapers, news magazines, and government or official publications are excluded.

Classification

The Index Islamicus classification scheme, which is uniquely and carefully geared to the field of Islamic Studies, allows one to quickly find all literature headed under a particular, broader subject area (such as Education, Philosophy, Shi’ism, Sudan, Palestine, Israel, as well as their subcategories). Learn more at Index Islamicus Online.

Index Islamicus Online is the international classified bibliography of publications in European languages on all aspects of Islam and the Muslim world. It contains more than 500,000 records that cover all the main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, as well as Muslims living elsewhere, and their history, beliefs, societies, cultures, languages and literatures. This unique and valuable bibliography is now available to Oregon State students, faculty and staff.

Index Islamicus includes material published by Western scholars in the fields of Humanities and Social Sciences, specialist area- and subject-based areas, and by Muslims writing in European languages. Publications recorded are in the form of articles, books and reviews. 

Periodicals

More than 5,000 journals are surveyed for inclusion in the database, together with conference proceedings, monographs, multi-authored works and book reviews. Journals and books are indexed down to the article and chapter level. Newspapers, news magazines, and government or official publications are excluded.

Classification

The Index Islamicus classification scheme, which is uniquely and carefully geared to the field of Islamic Studies, allows one to quickly find all literature headed under a particular, broader subject area (such as Education, Philosophy, Shi’ism, Sudan, Palestine, Israel, as well as their subcategories). Learn more at Index Islamicus Online.

Kick back with one of over 1,000 Kindle eBooks preloaded on the Kindle Voyage! Features include:

  • 6” touchscreen
  • Highest resolution and contrast display of any Kindle
  • Front light auto-adjusts brightness
  • Thin, lightweight design with pressure-based page-turn sensors
  • Origami cover for hands-free reading

Request one of the six Kindle Voyages and up to two additional titles at library.oregonstate.edu/kindles.

The Valley Library Circulation Desk has 12 Dell Latitude laptops available for long term borrowing. These laptops are intended to be term-long laptop substitutes for students without computers. As such, we are prioritizing students in need of a laptop due to hardship or unexpected misfortune.

For more information or to fill out the online application, go to bit.ly/valley-laptops

Applications are due by Friday, April 7th. Laptop recipients will be notified by Wednesday, April 12th. If you are not contacted by this date, you may be contacted at a later date as laptops are returned and become available. You may apply in all terms that you need a laptop.

If you have any questions, please contact the Valley Library Circulation Desk at valley.circ@oregonstate.edu or (541) 737-7254.

Don't leave your backpack or electronics unattended in the library or in other public areas on campus as thefts do occur. 

If you’d like to store your items in a secure place at the library, lockers are located throughout the Valley Library and may be reserved at the Circulation counter on the second floor near the library’s main entrance. 

If you see a theft or other crime in progress, immediately call 541-737-7000. For non-emergencies, such as to report a theft after it has occurred, call OSU Security at 541-737-3010.

What is Kanopy? Kanopy is a streaming video resource with a collection of more than 26,000 films from leading producers on almost every subject imaginable, including award-winning documentaries, training films and theatrical releases.

Kanopy is now available to OSU students, faculty and staff due to the joint support of OSU Libraries and Ecampus. Kanopy’s website makes it easy to watch, share and discuss films across campus. Check it out at http://oregonstate.kanopystreaming.com. For info on how students, student groups and faculty can use Kanopy, see below.

 

What Movies Are Available?

Criterion Collection movies: More than 400 feature films selected by Criterion Films.

International films: More than 450 films in 30 languages.

Documentaries: 3,200 documentaries, including from PBS and New Day Films.

Arts: More than 3,000 films on architecture, dance, design, fashion, music, photography and other arts.

Business: Case studies, career development, business skills, economics, globalization and other business topics.

Education: Films on teacher education development and education documentaries.

Global studies and languages: Includes African studies, Asian studies, ESL and languages, European/Baltic studies, Indigenous studies, Latin American studies, Middle Eastern studies, North American studies and more.

Health: Including child health, medicine, mental health, sports and fitness and more.

Instructional films and lessons: Films on food technology, health and safety, library and information management and more.

Media and communications: Includes films on advertising, journalism, marketing, media studies
and public relations.

Sciences: Covers the gamut of science from agriculture to veterinary medicine.

Social sciences: Including anthropology, gender studies, history, politics, religion and sociology.

 

Kanopy Tools

Create a user account: With a user account, you can create playlists or clips.

Share a movie or playlist: Copy and paste links to individual movies or playlists or embed a video into Canvas.

Transcripts and closed captions for a movie: For the small number of movies without closed captions/transcripts, a request for captioning is usually completed with 48 hours.

 

Student Use

INCLUDE KANOPY IN YOUR MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATIONS

While you can't embed a Kanopy video into PowerPoint, you can include a link to the video or clip.

1. Simply copy the film link into the Powerpoint, or

2. Paste an image relevant to the film into Powerpoint and then paste the direct film link behind the image so that clicking on the image will open the film. To do this:

  • Add the image to PowerPoint.
  • Right-click (on Windows OS computers) the selected text or image, then click Hyperlink. The Insert Hyperlink dialog box will appear.
  • On the left side of the dialog box, click Existing File or Webpage.
  • Click the drop-down arrow to browse for your file.
  • Select the desired file.
  • Click OK. 

 

Campus Groups

HAVE A MOVIE NIGHT OR CREATE A FILM SERIES FOR YOUR CAMPUS GROUP

Viewing Kanopy films in a group forum is permitted as long as the viewing is by authorized viewers and it is not for commercial benefit (no admission costs are charged and no profit is made from the screening).

As long as there is sufficient Internet access, videos can be projected onto a large screen with minimal loss of resolution. 

 

Faculty Use

INCORPORATE FILMS AND FILM CLIPS INTO YOUR COURSES

OSU LIbraries' subscription to Kanopy movies includes broad educational access. You can:

  • Create a playlist of required or suggested movies to share with classes.
  • Create a clip or set of clips to be embedded in Canvas or linked in your syllabus.
  • Show movies or clips from movies in the classroom.

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