Welcome to the OSU Libraries News and Events page!

Summer workshops from OSU Libraries that are coming up include an exploration of the Git version control system. Version control systems are tools that keep track of the changes made on a document, and help keep versions and merge files. They allow the user to decide which changes make up the next version, and keep useful data about them. Version control systems are usually used by developers and people who write code, but they are also very useful for people working with documents in general. 

Registration is encouraged but not required. View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series and register for your sessions (we’ll send you a reminder) at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops.

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

Summer workshops from OSU Libraries that are coming up include an exploration of the Git version control system. Version control systems are tools that keep track of the changes made on a document, and help keep versions and merge files. They allow the user to decide which changes make up the next version, and keep useful data about them. Version control systems are usually used by developers and people who write code, but they are also very useful for people working with documents in general. 

Registration is encouraged but not required. View all the offerings in the library’s summer workshop series and register for your sessions (we’ll send you a reminder) at http://bit.ly/graduate-workshops.

Questions? Contact Hannah.Rempel@oregonstate.edu.

The Valley Library Circulation Desk has 12 Dell Latitude laptops available for long term borrowing. These laptops are intended to be term-long laptop substitutes for students without computers. As such, we are prioritizing students in need of a laptop due to hardship or unexpected misfortune.

For more information or to fill out the online application, go to bit.ly/valley-laptops

Applications are due by Saturday, July 1st. Laptop recipients will be notified by Wednesday, July 5th. If you are not contacted by this date, you may be contacted at a later date as laptops are returned and become available. You may apply in all terms that you need a laptop.

If you have any questions, please contact the Valley Library Circulation Desk at valley.circ@oregonstate.edu or (541) 737-7254.

The Libraries and Press do amazing work, and an Impact Report is compiled each year that concisely and elegantly describes the work that we do and how many students are impacted by the resources and services of the Libraries and Press. 

In addition to scintillating facts and figures (like, how many people study and do research at the Valley Library in a year? Answer: 1.25 million) and an overview of some of the many accomplishments of Libraries and Press faculty and staff, there’s also some pretty cool quotes. Here’s one:

“Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore and achieve, and contribute to improving our quality of life. Libraries change lives for the better.”  — Sidney Sheldon

You can read the latest Impact Report for the Libraries and Press at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/impact_report_final.pdf.

Congratulations to Natalia Fernandez, who is a newly tenured library faculty member. Natalia was promoted to Associate Professor, an acknowledgement of her dedication and passion as the Oregon Multicultural Librarian at Oregon State University Libraries as well as stellar service and scholarship to the campus, profession, and the Oregon communities with whom she has partnered.

In addition, Natalia’s article “Las Historias de Latinos en Oregon: Canby, Oregon, An Oral History Project Collaboration Between a Librarian and an Archivist” was just published in the Oregon Library Quarterly. 


Congratulations to Natalia Fernandez, who is a newly tenured library faculty member. Natalia was promoted to Associate Professor, an acknowledgement of her dedication and passion as the Oregon Multicultural Librarian at Oregon State University Libraries as well as stellar service and scholarship to the campus, profession, and the Oregon communities with whom she has partnered.

In addition, Natalia’s article “Las Historias de Latinos en Oregon: Canby, Oregon, An Oral History Project Collaboration Between a Librarian and an Archivist” was just published in the Oregon Library Quarterly. 


Think it would be cool to be able to access books printed before 1700?

Now you can.

Students and faculty can now browse, read, mark up, download and mine thousands of texts originally printed from 1473 to 1700 in the United Kingdom and elsewhere using the Early English Books Online (EEBO) database that's now available through OSU Libraries. 

Access to the Early English Books Online collection is as easy as typing “EEBO” in the search box on the Libraries homepage at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu and logging in with your OSU password. 

From the first book published in English through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare, this incomparable collection contains more than 130,000 titles and more than 17 million scanned pages. Scholars have long treasured this collection, and now it’s accessible online. 

“I am thrilled that we are finally able to offer EEBO to the faculty and students of Oregon State University,” says Laurel Kristick, Collection Assessment and Science Librarian at OSU Libraries. “We‘ve been working on this for almost a decade and finally had the donor funds we needed to purchase it.” 

The EEBO database now contains page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473–1700. In addition to English, EEBO covers more than 30 languages from Algonquin to Welsh. More than 200 libraries worldwide have contributed to the EEBO collection. 

The content covers science, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, geography and all other areas of human endeavor, including topics from sword fighting to witchcraft and gardening manuals. The collections have been most widely used by scholars of English, linguistics and history, although these resources also include core texts in art, women’s studies, the history of science, education, religious studies, math, law and music. 

The following are but a small sampling of the authors whose works are included: Erasmus, Shakespeare, King James I, Marlowe, Galileo, Caxton, Chaucer, Malory, Boyle, Newton, Locke, More, Milton, Spenser, Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Purcell, Behn and Defoe.

Besides browsing and reading through these early English books, users can search through the entire corpus. Searching for keywords and themes is possible because the text has been encoded with Extensible Markup Language (XML). To accompany the page images, accurate transcriptions have been created of many thousands of the works in order to aid researchers of all levels.

Think it would be cool to be able to access books printed before 1700?

Now you can.

Students and faculty can now browse, read, mark up, download and mine thousands of texts originally printed from 1473 to 1700 in the United Kingdom and elsewhere using the Early English Books Online (EEBO) database that's now available through OSU Libraries. 

Access to the Early English Books Online collection is as easy as typing “EEBO” in the search box on the Libraries homepage at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu and logging in with your OSU password. 

From the first book published in English through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare, this incomparable collection contains more than 130,000 titles and more than 17 million scanned pages. Scholars have long treasured this collection, and now it’s accessible online. 

“I am thrilled that we are finally able to offer EEBO to the faculty and students of Oregon State University,” says Laurel Kristick, Collection Assessment and Science Librarian at OSU Libraries. “We‘ve been working on this for almost a decade and finally had the donor funds we needed to purchase it.” 

The EEBO database now contains page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473–1700. In addition to English, EEBO covers more than 30 languages from Algonquin to Welsh. More than 200 libraries worldwide have contributed to the EEBO collection. 

The content covers science, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, geography and all other areas of human endeavor, including topics from sword fighting to witchcraft and gardening manuals. The collections have been most widely used by scholars of English, linguistics and history, although these resources also include core texts in art, women’s studies, the history of science, education, religious studies, math, law and music. 

The following are but a small sampling of the authors whose works are included: Erasmus, Shakespeare, King James I, Marlowe, Galileo, Caxton, Chaucer, Malory, Boyle, Newton, Locke, More, Milton, Spenser, Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Purcell, Behn and Defoe.

Besides browsing and reading through these early English books, users can search through the entire corpus. Searching for keywords and themes is possible because the text has been encoded with Extensible Markup Language (XML). To accompany the page images, accurate transcriptions have been created of many thousands of the works in order to aid researchers of all levels.

Think it would be cool to be able to access books printed before 1700?

Now you can.

Students and faculty can now browse, read, mark up, download and mine thousands of texts originally printed from 1473 to 1700 in the United Kingdom and elsewhere using the Early English Books Online (EEBO) database that's now available through OSU Libraries. 

Access to the Early English Books Online collection is as easy as typing “EEBO” in the search box on the Libraries homepage at http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu and logging in with your OSU password. 

From the first book published in English through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare, this incomparable collection contains more than 130,000 titles and more than 17 million scanned pages. Scholars have long treasured this collection, and now it’s accessible online. 

“I am thrilled that we are finally able to offer EEBO to the faculty and students of Oregon State University,” says Laurel Kristick, Collection Assessment and Science Librarian at OSU Libraries. “We‘ve been working on this for almost a decade and finally had the donor funds we needed to purchase it.” 

The EEBO database now contains page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473–1700. In addition to English, EEBO covers more than 30 languages from Algonquin to Welsh. More than 200 libraries worldwide have contributed to the EEBO collection. 

The content covers science, literature, philosophy, politics, religion, geography and all other areas of human endeavor, including topics from sword fighting to witchcraft and gardening manuals. The collections have been most widely used by scholars of English, linguistics and history, although these resources also include core texts in art, women’s studies, the history of science, education, religious studies, math, law and music. 

The following are but a small sampling of the authors whose works are included: Erasmus, Shakespeare, King James I, Marlowe, Galileo, Caxton, Chaucer, Malory, Boyle, Newton, Locke, More, Milton, Spenser, Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Purcell, Behn and Defoe.

Besides browsing and reading through these early English books, users can search through the entire corpus. Searching for keywords and themes is possible because the text has been encoded with Extensible Markup Language (XML). To accompany the page images, accurate transcriptions have been created of many thousands of the works in order to aid researchers of all levels.

Index Islamicus Online is the international classified bibliography of publications in European languages on all aspects of Islam and the Muslim world. It contains more than 500,000 records that cover all the main Muslim areas of Asia and Africa, as well as Muslims living elsewhere, and their history, beliefs, societies, cultures, languages and literatures. This unique and valuable bibliography is now available to Oregon State students, faculty and staff.

Index Islamicus includes material published by Western scholars in the fields of Humanities and Social Sciences, specialist area- and subject-based areas, and by Muslims writing in European languages. Publications recorded are in the form of articles, books and reviews. 

Periodicals

More than 5,000 journals are surveyed for inclusion in the database, together with conference proceedings, monographs, multi-authored works and book reviews. Journals and books are indexed down to the article and chapter level. Newspapers, news magazines, and government or official publications are excluded.

Classification

The Index Islamicus classification scheme, which is uniquely and carefully geared to the field of Islamic Studies, allows one to quickly find all literature headed under a particular, broader subject area (such as Education, Philosophy, Shi’ism, Sudan, Palestine, Israel, as well as their subcategories). Learn more at Index Islamicus Online.

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